You are viewing Aaker on Brands blog posts from July, 2012 (4 total). You can also view all blog posts.

Learnings from A Human Library

The human library has its roots in the city library of Malmo, Sweden, which allows curious visitors to check out living people for a 45-minute conversation. The experience is designed to confront prejudices and promote understanding. The people available to be “checked out” included a gypsy, a transvestite, a blind man, a journalist and an animal rights activist, and the conversation allows people to learn about the life and beliefs of an individual that had been misunderstood, stereotyped and often avoided.

Prophet’s version of a human library is designed to provide inspiration to a team that wants to develop a big innovation, improve an offering or user experience, enhance a brand relationship, or improve a sales or marketing program. With context and objective in place, a wide array of human “books” that are relevant but tangential to the context are purposefully selected to create unexpected sources of insight.

An apparel manufacturer found that its multi-product…

Continue reading…

July 25, 2012  •  Permalink

Four Strategies for Staying Relevant

A serious threat facing most brands in dynamic markets is the loss of relevance because the category or subcategory they are serving is declining. Customers are no longer buying what the brand is perceived to make. New categories or subcategories emerge as competitors' innovations create "must haves." This dynamic can happen even if the brand is strong; customers are loyal; and the offering has never been better, thanks to incremental innovations.

Relevance dominates. If a group of customers wants a battery powered car it does not matter how much they love your hybrid brand. It will not be relevant. A newspaper can have the best new coverage and editorial staff, but if readers are diverted to cable news or blogs, relevance will decline. The ultimate tragedy is to achieve brilliant differentiation, winning the preference battle, only to have that effort wasted as its relevance declines.

How does a brand stay relevant? How can a brand avoid the disinvest or milking decision? There…

Continue reading…

July 18, 2012  •  Permalink

Marketing Advice that (Almost) Always Works — Solving The NFL Attendance Problem

When I am asked for guidance on a brand or marketing problem, I usually respond that I know a method that is “guaranteed” to work: Find an organization that has successfully addressed a similar problem, and adapt what they did. Don’t limit the search to those organizations that look like your own, but be willing to look more broadly.

The NFL has a serious attendance problem due to the incredible experience provided by home television coverage, the high cost of tickets, the hassle of going to the event and the event experience. There is not only a risk to an important income source, but also to the experience. Playing to half-empty stadiums with passive crowds would affect the on-site and the viewing experience.

My view is that the NFL needs to look to role models. Consider the NASCAR experience,…

Continue reading…

July 11, 2012  •  Permalink

Strategies from the New Emerging Market Competitors

When I was in China several years ago, I felt that the firms there would eventually become leading global players. And now it’s happening, and a new book, The New Emerging Marketing Multinationals by Amitava Chattopadhyay and Rajeev Batra (with Aysegul Ozsomer) explains how. The authors report a study of some 39 firms that have made a move toward global prominence.

There are four strategies that have been employed by EMNCs (emerging multinational corporations).

The first: Acting as a cost leader by leveraging local low-cost human resources to provide low-end products, often starting with private-label brands that gain volume sales in their home market and in other assessable markets as well.

The second: The knowledge leverage-er who draws upon specialized knowledge of customer needs when the conditions are privative and the income is low. The…

Continue reading…

July 3, 2012  •  Permalink